The



Peeragogy

  handbook

Stasis

Definition: Actually, living beings are never really in stasis. It just sometimes feels that way. Other anti-patterns like Isolation and Navel Gazing have described different aspects of the experience of feeling like one is in stasis. Typically, what is happening in such a case is that one or more dimensions of life are moving very slowly.

Problem: When important things are moving slowly or not at all, and when they are mostly or entirely out of your control, this can be frustrating.

Solution: It’s tempting in this case just to be upset and to feel disempowered.

Example: We were not able to get programming support to improve the first version of the Social Media Classroom, since all developer energy was allocated to the next version of the system. It becomes frustrating if a specific small feature is desired, but unavailable.

Challenges: Of course, it’s very unpleasant to be frustrated all the time. The hint to pick up is that there is always some dimension on which you can make progress. It might not be the same one you’ve been working on — you might have “over-harvested” that niche (see Carrying Capacity).

What’s Next: We’re working on a new handbook chapter about the relationship of open source software and peeragogy. This will include some more specific ideas about ways of making change.

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